On March 20, President Iván Duque ordered a mandatory preventive quarantine throughout Colombia, which is the most drastic measure, to try to stop the spread of coronavirus. We provide a guide to the nationwide quarantine in Colombia starting on March 24 that has now been extended for the eighth time to September 1 to contain the spread of coronavirus.

This Colombia quarantine will affect the daily life of over 50 million inhabitants of Colombia. 

Over 100 questions have been received from Medellin Guru readers about this nationwide Colombia quarantine. So, we published this article that answers common questions.

On September 24, Colombia reached a total of 790,823 coronavirus cases. The goal of the nationwide quarantine in Colombia was to contain the spread of coronavirus.

Several cities in Colombia held shorter quarantines starting on March 20 over the Saint Joseph’s Day holiday weekend and the nationwide quarantine in Colombia started after these other quarantines ended.

EDITORS NOTE: on July 28, Colombia extended the quarantine in an announcement to August 30 but when a decree was issued this extension was actually until September 1. The mandatory quarantine in Colombia that started on March 24 has now been extended for the eighth time until September 1, which was the last day. So, the quarantine was for 160 days.

Technically the quarantine is until the 00:00 hour of September 1, which is actually at midnight on August 31.

When extending the quarantine for the eighth time, President Duque said: 

The municipalities that are not affected by COVID-19 will continue to advance in a gradual process of liberation of sectors, without agglomerations or entertainment spaces and the current restrictions regarding the liquor stores are maintained.

In addition, the president added that in the municipalities of low rates of infection will continue to advance with pilots in different sectors for their reopening but with the approval of the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Interior.

The Colombian borders will continue to be closed except for the border with Ecuador that opened on June 23 just for humanitarian transit of citizens and permanent foreign residents. Also, there will be no domestic flights during the period from June 1 to June 30. Domestic flights in Colombia resumed in July..

Also, according to the Minister of transport, international flights will be restricted until August 31 with international flights resuming with a pilot in September. But humanitarian flights are permitted. 

EDITORS NOTE: On August 24, President Duque announced that the national quarantine in Colombia ends on September 1. On September 1, a new phase begins where the concept of mandatory preventive isolation changes to a concept of selective isolation of physical distancing and individual responsibility.

Colombia Quarantine Extended to September 1

Colombia’s initial nationwide quarantine was originally ending on April 13 but it has now been extended eight times:

  1. On April 6, was extended to April 26
  2. On April 20, was extended to May 11.
  3. A third time was extended to May 25
  4. A fourth time was extended to May 31
  5. A fifth time was extended to June 30
  6. On June 23, was extended a sixth time to July 15
  7. On July 7, was extended a seventh time to August 1
  8. On July 28, was extended an eighth time to September 1

So, the national quarantine is now for 160 days and ended on September 1.

However, the quarantine extension that started on April 27 started to lift the quarantine. President Duque announced that the mandatory quarantine, will allow, with very strict protocols, to open the manufacturing and construction sectors of the economy in Colombia.

We have a separate article that looks more in detail at Colombia starting to lift the quarantine on April 27.

Manufacturing, construction and other employers must implement certain sanitary and social distancing measures such as taking temperature and face masks.

During the quarantine extension to September 1, events will not take place and bars and discos will remain closed, restaurants can only provide domicilio (delivery) but some restaurants in Medellín and the Aburrá Valley start a pilot of reopening for table service in July. And universities and other schools will remain closed.

In terms of municipalities in which coronavirus infections have not yet been confirmed with coronavirus cases, President Duque on April 20 said:

In hundreds of municipalities in Colombia, there have been no cases of COVID-19, so there we are going to promote a productive economic recovery but maintaining all the protocols for the protection of health and life.

So, according to President Duque, started to lift the quarantine even more in cities and towns and departments (states) without a coronavirus presence. 

  • On September 24, 2020, the majority of coronavirus cases (81.2 percent) in Colombia were in only 10 departments (states) in Colombia out of 33 departments
  • On September 24, 2020, the majority of coronavirus cases (71.9 percent) in Colombia were in only 18 cities in Colombia.
  • Over 70 cities, towns and pueblos on September 24 in Colombia haven’t reported a single coronavirus case.
  • Over 100 cities, towns and pueblos on September 24 in Colombia with coronavirus cases haven’t reported a case in over two weeks.

New Quarantine Phase Started on June 1

Does the quarantine end on August 1? No, the quarantine was until September 1 and ended on September 1. But a new phase started on June 1.

A new phase of the quarantine started from June 1 to 30 with the reopening of museums, libraries and some other businesses. In addition, reopening of shopping malls was allowed, without exceeding 35 percent of the capacity. 

Also, starting in June, starts an “intelligent lockdown” that would allow the relaxation of restriction of movement measures based on regional conditions. These regional relaxation measures will be expanded “gradually” to recover productive life

Starting on June 1, open-air time outside the home for exercise is permitted for the following groups:

  • Children from 2 to 5 years old are permitted outdoor activities three times a week for 30 minutes a day.
  • Between 6 and 17 years old are permitted outdoor activities three times a week for one hour a day.
  • Adults between 18 and 69 years old will be able to do outdoor activities every day for two hours.

For those over 70 years old and people with underlying diseases, such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, cancer, the open air time is limited to three times a week, 30 minutes a day.

The mayors of municipalities in Colombia will be in charge of setting the schedules for open-air times and, in general, they will have in their hands the key to gradualness.

Colombia Quarantine Decree Details Starting on June 1

The National Government issued Decree 749 on May 28, 2020, which it mandates the national quarantine in Colombia, starting on June 1, and includes over 40 activities that are permitted, in order to gain a productive life.

This rule, in article 3, Guarantees for the Mandatory Preventive Isolation measure, states that the governors and mayors, in the framework of the health emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic, will allow the right of movement of people in the following cases or activities:

  1. Assistance and provision of health services.
  2. Acquisition and payment of goods and services (shopping and banking).
  3. Assistance and care for children, adolescents, people over 70 years of age, people with disabilities and patients with special treatments that require assistance from trained personnel.
  4. Due to force majeure or fortuitous event.
  5. Tasks of the medical missions of the Pan American Health Organization and of all international humanitarian and health organizations, the provision of public and private professional, administrative, operational, and technical health services.
  6. The chain of production, supply, storage, transportation, marketing and distribution of medicines, pharmaceuticals, supplies, cleaning products, disinfection and personal hygiene for homes and hospitals, equipment and devices of health technologies, as well as maintenance and support to guarantee the continuous provision of health services. The operation of establishments and commercial premises for the commercialization of medicines, pharmaceuticals, supplies, equipment and devices of health technologies.
  7. Activities related to emergency services, including veterinary emergencies.
  8. Funeral services, burials and cremations.
  9. The chain of production, supply, storage, transport, commercialization and distribution of: inputs to produce basic necessities; basic necessities – food, beverages, medicines, medical devices, cleaning, cleaning, and goods of ordinary consumption in the population; laboratory reagents; food, medicines and other products for pets, as well as the elements and goods necessary to attend to the sanitary emergency, and the chain of supplies related to the production of these goods.
  10. The chain of sowing, fumigation, harvesting, production, packaging, packaging, import, export, transport, storage, distribution and marketing of: seeds, inputs and agricultural, fishing, aquaculture, livestock and agrochemical products -fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides , herbicides-, and animal feed, maintenance of animal health, the operation of primary and secondary food processing centers, the operation of the commercialization infrastructure, major and minor irrigation for the supply of population and agricultural water, and the technical assistance. The logistics and transportation of the above activities will be guaranteed. Likewise, the maintenance activities of boats and agricultural or fishing machinery.
  11. Face-to-face marketing of basic necessity products will be carried out in stores, warehouses, markets, wholesale and retail supermarkets and retail markets in establishments and commercial premises nationwide, and they may market their products through electronic commerce platforms and/or for home delivery.
  12. Activities of public servants, state contractors, individuals who perform public functions and other personnel necessary to prevent, mitigate and attend to the health emergency due to the COVID-19 coronavirus, and guarantee the operation of State services.
  13. Activities of the personnel of the diplomatic and consular missions duly accredited to the Colombian State, strictly necessary to prevent, mitigate and attend to the health emergency due to the COVID-19 coronavirus.
  14. The activities of the Military Forces, the National Police and State security agencies, as well as the military and defense industry, and officials of the Attorney General’s Office and the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences.
  15. Activities of public and private service ports, exclusively for cargo transportation.
  16. Maritime and river dredging activities.
  17. Execution of transport infrastructure works and public works, as well as the supply chain of materials and supplies related to their execution.
  18. Activities of the construction sector, execution of civil works and remodeling.
  19. The air and airport operation in accordance with the provisions of article 8 of the decree, and their respective maintenance.
  20. Commercialization of the products of gastronomic establishments and premises, including those located in hotels, through electronic commerce platforms, by home delivery and by take-away delivery.
  21. Activities of the hotel industry to serve its guests, strictly necessary to prevent, mitigate and attend the health emergency due to the COVID-19 coronavirus.
  22. Operation of critical infrastructure including computers, computer systems, communication networks, data and information, whose destruction or interference can weaken or impact the security of the economy, public health or a combination of them.
  23. Operation and operation of call centers, contact centers, technical support centers and data processing centers that provide services in the national territory and electronic commerce platforms.
  24. The operation of the provision of private security and surveillance services, prison and penitentiary services.
  25. Cleaning and toilet service, including the domestic service and laundry service.
  26. Activities necessary to guarantee the operation, maintenance, storage and supply of the provision of: public services of aqueduct, sewage, electric energy, public lighting, cleanliness (collection, transportation, use and final disposal, recycling, including biological waste or sanitary) and recovery. of materials; of the logistics chain of inputs, supplies for the production, supply, import, export and supply of hydrocarbons, liquid fuels, biofuels, natural gas, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG); of the supply logistics chain, supplies for the production, supply, import, export and supply of minerals, and internet and telephone service.
  27. Provision of services including banking; financial; payment postal operators; currency buying and selling professionals; operations of games of luck and chance in the form of novel and territorial permanent bets; chance and lottery; Central risk; transport of valuables; notarial activities and registration of public instruments, and issuance of urban planning licenses.
  28. The Superintendent of Notaries and Registry will determine the hours and shifts in which notarial services will be provided, guaranteeing the provision of the service to the most vulnerable people and those with special constitutional protection.
  29. The Superintendent of Notaries and Registry will determine the hours and shifts in which the services will be provided by the registry offices of public instruments.
  30. Operation of postal, courier, radio, television, press and distribution services of the media.
  31. The supply and distribution of basic necessities  including food, beverages, medicines, medical devices, hygiene, cleaning, and goods of ordinary consumption in the population – under social programs of the State and private persons.
  32. Activities of the inter-religious sector related to institutional emergency programs, humanitarian, spiritual and psychological aid.
  33. The production, supply, storage, repair, maintenance, transport and distribution chain of manufacturing industries.
  34. Wholesale and retail trade, including the operation of shopping centers and real estate activities.
  35. Activities of operators of payments of wages, fees, pensions, public and private economic benefits; periodic social economic benefits (BEPS), and those corresponding to the Social Security and Social Protection systems and subsystems.
  36. The strictly necessary displacement of the directing and teaching staff of public and private educational institutions, to prevent, mitigate and attend to the health emergency due to the COVID-19 coronavirus.
  37. Carrying out of appraisals of goods and carrying out of studies of titles that have the purpose of the constitution of guarantees, before entities supervised by the Financial Superintendence of Colombia.
  38. The operation of family police stations and police inspections, as well as their users.
  39. The manufacture, repair, maintenance and purchase and sale of spare parts and accessories for conventional and electric bicycles.
  40. Public parking for vehicles.
  41. Museums and libraries.
  42. Practical and research laboratories of institutions of higher education and education for work and human development.
  43. Professional, technical and service activities in general.
  44. Hairdressing services.
  45. In accordance with the measures, instructions and schedules established by the mayors in their respective territorial jurisdictions, and in any case subject to the biosafety protocols established for this purpose, the following will also be allowed:
  • The development of physical activities and outdoor exercise of people who are in the age range of 18 to 69 years, for a maximum period of two hours a day.
  • The development of physical activities and outdoor exercise of children over 6 years old, three times a week, one hour a day.
  • The development of physical activities and outdoor exercise of children between 2 and 5 years old, three times a week, half an hour a day.
  • The development of physical activities and outdoor exercise of adults over 70 years, three times a week, half an hour a day.

The persons who carry out the above activities must be accredited or identified in the exercise of their functions or activities.

In addition, the circulation of a single person per family will be allowed to carry out the activities described in number 2 above. Also, when a person listed in number 3 must leave his place of residence or isolation, he may do so accompanied by a person who serves as support.

In order to protect the integrity of people and pets, and in attention to biosafety measures, only one person per family may take out pets.

Furthermore, mayors with the due authorization of the Ministry of the Interior may suspend the activities or cases established in this article.

So, the bottom line is one designated person per family can go shopping to grocery stores and pharmacies and also do banking plus walk dogs.

In addition, many grocery stores and most pharmacies offer domocilio (delivery) services. And some restaurants are still open that offer delivery services.

Penalties for Violating the Colombia Quarantine

Anyone who violates the measures adopted and the instructions given in the Decree of Mandatory Preventive Isolation, will reportedly be subject to a penal sanction provided for in article 368 of the Colombia Penal Code.

Article 368 indicates that whoever violates a sanitary measure adopted by the competent authority to prevent the introduction or spread of an epidemic, will be imprisoned for four to eight years.

In addition, a violator will have to pay the fines ordered by Decree 780 of 2016, issued by the Ministry of Health and Social Protection.

Be careful of violating this quarantine. The police in the Aburrá Valley are out in force and have reportedly caught over 2,300 people who have violated the quarantines in the metropolitan area, as of March 25.

Also, there is a strict quarantine in Medellín and the Aburrá Valley for a period of four weeks on long weekends (Friday to Sunday) and holidays, which has very stiff penalties for violating the quarantine.

New Sectors Permitted to Return to Work on May 11

Starting on May 11, several sectors were permitted to return to work:

  1. Manufacture of furniture, mattresses and bed bases.
  2. Manufacture of motor vehicles, trailers and semi-trailers.
  3. Manufacture of computer, electronic and optical products.
  4. Manufacture of machinery and equipment.
  5. Maintenance and repair of motor vehicles.
  6. Maintenance and repair of technology and computer equipment.
  7. Wholesale and retail trade of vehicles (including parts, pieces and accessories).
  8. Wholesale trade of furniture and household goods.
  9. Wholesale trade of machinery and equipment.
  10. Retail trade of pet products.
  11. Retail trade of construction materials, hardware, locksmiths and glass and paint products in specialized stores.
  12. Retail trade of fuels, lubricants, additives and cleaning products for motor vehicles in specialized establishments.
  13. Retail trade of books, newspapers, materials, stationery and desks in specialized stores.
  14. Laundry services at home.
  15. Activities related to the operation of establishments providing vehicle maintenance services, appliances, boats, agricultural or fishing machinery, according to the different modes of transport, as well as the establishments in which the supply and / or installation of vehicles spare parts.
  16. Automotive diagnostic centers.

These sectors are in addition to previously permitted sectors that were permitted to return to work two weeks ago including construction, textiles and chemical substances.

President Duque stressed that these new sectors will be reactivated gradually and in accordance with the biosafety protocols issued by the Ministry of Health and Social Protection and according to the particular conditions at the regional level.

COVID-19 Free Municipalities Can Start to Open

In the municipalities without affectation of COVID-19, all the economic opening will potentially be allowed to start opening on May 11, with some exceptions: billiards, casinos and discotheques, churches, parks, gyms and sporting events.

This measure will only apply if the mayor expressly requests the Ministry of the Interior to reopen the sectors or activities that he deems pertinent and prior certification from the Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS) in this regard.

To guarantee that the municipalities remain uncontaminated, the local authorities must implement biosecurity measures at their borders.

Once the existence of a case of contagion in a municipality by the INS is certified, the opening of economic sectors carried out should be automatically restricted and the quarantine guidelines reestablished in general for the affected municipality. So, municipalities that open up need to remain virus free.

Starting on May 18, Colombia started to lift the quarantine in nearly 200 COVID-19 free municipalities, so they can start to return to normal. But some had to return to quarantine due to experiencing cases.

New Quarantine Measures in Medellín Starting on April 27

On Monday, April 27, approximately 500,000 people working in the construction and manufacturing sectors started to return to work in the Aburrá Valley.

They will join about 300,000 other people who were still working in basic sectors such as health and food, which means that next week in the Aburrá Valley up to 800,000 people will be circulating daily.

According to the mayor of Medellín, Daniel Quintero, it becomes necessary to take new measures for transportation, companies and citizens, to avoid crowds and outbreaks of coronavirus.

The companies authorized to restart work and their employees will have a new requirements to operate. And in case of non-compliance or having more than two members of their teams infected with the virus, a company will have a two-week shutdown similar to what was already done at Plaza Minorista. These are the new requirements:

Each company authorized to return throughout the Aburrá Valley, must register on the Medellín Me Cuida platform, which has section for companies that will be enabled by Friday at 2:00 p.m. On this site, employers must report their employees and the measures taken.

Employees who are going to be registered in this platform must also register. Also, this new requirement applies to health, call center, service and food companies, which have not stopped work during this quarantine.

The data on companies and employees will be connected to an application that the police will have on the street to verify whether or not people are authorized to go outside. In case they do not have permission, they will be sanctioned.

Employees of companies are only authorized to go from home to work and from work to home. And  if any citizen who works for these companies has coronavirus or is in contact with someone infected, they should enter obligatory preventive isolation.

Companies from all over the Antioquia department will be able to register in the database, in case they have personnel who are in the Aburrá Valley or have to come to the Aburrá Valley.

In addition, the Medellín Metro may only operate with a maximum 35 percent occupancy on its trains. That means, starting on Monday there may be more and longer lines to use the system.

Furthermore, in the Aburrá Valley, all companies in the new sectors with exceptions from the quarantine (manufacturing and construction) must distribute their employees in three shifts:

  • From 6:00 am to 2:00 pm.
  • From 8:00 am to 4:00 pm.
  • From 10:00 am to 6:00 pm.
The Medellín Metro will only be able to operate at 35 percent of capacity

The Medellín Metro will only be able to operate at 35 percent of capacity

Furthermore, according to El Colombiano newspaper, the Medellín Metro was supposed to carry out a check by freezing the Civica cards of people who do not appear in the database of authorized employees. But this information is completely inaccurate. I confirmed on April 29 you can still use the metro with the Pico y Cedula restrictions based on the last number of your ID.

Also, the Encicla public bicycle system will be operational again starting on April 27, with disinfection frequently for the 1,600 bicycles and 80 stations.

 

Autopista highway with no cars at Mayorca mall in Sabaneta south of Medellín on March 21 during the quarantine in Medellín and Antioquia

Autopista highway with no cars at Mayorca mall in Sabaneta south of Medellín on March 21 during the quarantine in Medellín and Antioquia

Quarantines in Other Countries

Colombia joins the list of countries that have decreed national quarantines to deal with coronavirus, including Argentina, France, Italy and Spain.

For example, in Argentina, President Alberto Fernández issued a decree prohibiting all citizens from leaving their homes, with the exception of going out to buy food or medicine. The mandatory quarantine order in Argentina went into effect at midnight on March 20.

And in Spain on March 15, the government limited to the movement of citizens, in an unprecedented measure for this country. In Spain, citizens can only leave the house for essential travel to supermarkets and pharmacies – and reportedly must somehow prove that’s where they’re going.

In total, more than 900 million people in nearly 35 countries are currently affected by restrictions in movement due to coronavirus.

Flatten the coronavirus case curve, source CDC

Flatten the coronavirus case curve, source CDC

Why Quarantine? – Flatten the Curve

With a nationwide quarantine, Colombia is trying to avoid a rapid spike of coronavirus cases that could overwhelm the health care system in Colombia by “flattening the curve,” or spreading out the number of coronavirus cases over a longer period.

Mitigation efforts like a quarantine, cancelling international flights, closing places where people congregate and limiting the size of events are mitigation efforts that reduce the number of daily cases and reduce pressure on the healthcare system in Colombia.

Colombia Ministerio de Salud (Ministry of Health) reported the number of coronavirus cases in Colombia on September 24 – a total of 790,823 cases with 24,924 deaths.

The first coronavirus case in Colombia was on March 6, 2020 and by September 24 the number of cases had grown to 790,823 cases.

Colombia was successful in initially flattening its curve compared to other countries and what is now important is to watch for a decrease in new daily coronavirus cases in Colombia.

So the next thing to watch for is a drop in new daily coronavirus cases in Colombia. The following chart shows a running 7-day average of new coronavirus cases in Colombia daily, so you can see the trend of new daily cases for more than the past month.

7-day running average of new daily coronavirus cases in Colombia, data source: Instituto Nacional de Salud, 9/24

7-day running average of new daily coronavirus cases in Colombia, data source: Instituto Nacional de Salud, 9/24

In the 80 days from July 8 to September 24, a total of 77 percent of the coronavirus cases in Colombia were in the 27 cities of Apartadó, BarrancabermejaBarranquilla, Bello, Buenaventura, Bucaramanga, Bogotá, Cali, Cartagena, Cúcuta, Envigado, Ibagué, Itagüí, Maico, Medellín, Monteria, Neiva, Pasto, Pereira, Santa Marta, Sabanalarga, Sincelejo, Soacha, Soledad, Valledupar and Villavicencio and Zipaquirá, with the 27 cities in Colombia averaging 6,385 cases per day.

The over 1,100 other municipalities in Colombia not including these 27 cities during the same 80 days averaged 1,945 cases per day.

Bogotá is the largest city in Colombia with the most cases. Also, we added Apartadó, BarrancabermejaBello, Buenaventura, Bucaramanga, Cali, Cartagena, Envigado, Galapa, Ibagué, Itagüí, Medellín, Monteria, Neiva Pasto, Pereira, Puerto Colombia, Quibdó, Santa Marta, SincelejoSoacha, Soledad, Valledupar, Villavicencio and Zipaquirá to the red city list due to an increase in cases.

We have a separate article that looks at these cities with a major increase in coronavirus cases in Colombia.

Common Reader Questions About the Colombia Quarantine

We have been asked over 50 questions by readers about the Colombia quarantine and the following are the six most commonly asked questions.

1. Can I extend my tourist visa to stay in Colombia longer?

Yes, you are permitted to stay up to 180 days in Colombia as a tourist. Tourist visas/stamps are typically for 90 days and can be extended for another 90 days without leaving Colombia.

In the past, Migracion Colombia rejected renewals if more than about 10 days before your tourist visa expires. But Migracion Colombia is now swamped with tourist visa extensions. So, we recommend submitting two weeks or more in advance before your tourist visa expires.

We have a popular guide to extending a tourist visa and tourist visas can be extended again starting on September 21. 

2. Can I fly domestically in Colombia?

During the national quarantine in Colombia, all domestic flights were suspended in Colombia until in July when domestic flights started to resume.

For example, Avianca was planning to operate only 10 planes for all its domestic flights in Colombia with domestic flights open up again. This reportedly will be a reduction of over 75 percent of domestic flights for Avianca.

3. Are international flights still flying, can I leave?

Starting on March 23, the arrival of international travelers to Colombia was suspended. Also, the land and sea borders of Colombia were closed. So, you couldn’t leave by land or sea.

Not long after March 23, essentially all international flights were suspended or cancelled, as there were no passengers on flights to Colombia starting on March 23.

And no international flights were permitted in Colombia until September 19 when international flights resume in Colombia, with the exception of humanitarian flights arranged by embassies.

We have a separate article that looks at humanitarian flights from Colombia to the U.S. and other countries.

4. I have been in Colombia for about 130 days and want to stay over 180, can I get a Colombian visa to stay longer than a tourist?

Yes, Colombia has many visa options. We have a comprehensive guide to Colombia visas and a total of 20 articles about Colombian visa and passports.

Medellin Guru partnered with a visa agency that can help you obtain a visa. Over the past 18 months, this partner visa service helped over 240 clients obtain Colombian visas. And visas are still being processed in Colombia during the coronavirus pandemic.

Use the Medellin Guru Colombia Visa Service

5. What happens if I can’t leave but exceed the time on my tourist visa?

If you exceed 180 days as a tourist in Colombia during a calendar year or stay more than 180 days consecutively as a tourist, you are normally liable for paying a fine before leaving the country, which is covered in our article about tourist visas.

However, Colombia Migracion is expected to be lenient, as international flights are not available. Also, according to Resolucion 1006 of April 1, 2020, you will get 30 days after the ending of the health emergency to extend your tourist visa or leave the country

6. Will I be able to shop for groceries during the quarantine?

Yes, one person per family can go shopping for groceries during the quarantine. There is no need to and try to stock up food for the entire time of the quarantine.

However, municipalities in the Aburrá Valley including Medellín, Envigado, Sabaneta, Itagüí, La Estrella, Bello, Barbosa, Girardota and Copacabana have added a Pico y Cedula system that limits the days you can go grocery shopping based on the last digit of your ID. But this Pico y Cedula ended on August 30.

Medellin Guru’s Coronavirus Series

Medellin Guru has a series of articles about the coronavirus pandemic and the impacts in Colombia: Also, these articles are being kept up-to-date, as this is a fast-moving topic:

The Bottom Line: Colombia Quarantine – Nationwide Quarantine From March 24 to September 1

Colombia is serious about putting in place proactive measures to minimize the public health threats posed by coronavirus in Colombia.

Colombia joins several other countries that have implemented lockdowns including Argentina, France, Italy and Spain. 

The bottom line is the nationwide quarantine in Colombia will definitely slow down the spreading of coronavirus that could infect thousands in a matter of weeks.

Bookmark our Colombia coronavirus status page that is normally updated once or twice daily to see if Colombia is successful in reducing the increase in daily coronavirus cases.

Try to stay home as much as possible during this Colombia quarantine and if you go out wash your hands often. Stay safe!

Sign up for the Free Medellin Guru Newsletter – You can see all of the previous Medellin Guru weekly email newsletters and sign up here.

Editors note: updated on July 7, 2020 with information that the quarantine in Colombia has been extended to August 1.

Editors note: updated on July 20, 2020 with Colombia coronavirus information for July 19.

Editors note: updated on July 25, 2020 with Colombia coronavirus information for July 24.

Editors note: updated on July 28, 2020 with information that the quarantine in Colombia has been extended to August 30.

Editors note: updated on July 29, 2020 with revised information that the quarantine in Colombia has been extended to September 1, with the date in the decree different than the announcement on July 28.

Editors note: updated on August 1, 2020 with Colombia coronavirus information for July 31.

Editors note: updated on August 7, 2020 with Colombia coronavirus information for August 6.

Editors note: updated on August 12, 2020 with Colombia coronavirus information for August 11.

Editors note: updated on August 14, 2020 with Colombia coronavirus information for August 13.

Editors note: updated on August 21, 2020 with Colombia coronavirus information for August 20.

Editors note: updated on August 24, 2020 with information that President Duque announced that the national quarantine in Colombia ends on September 1.

Editors note: updated on August 26, 2020 with Colombia coronavirus information for August 25.

Editors note: updated on August 29, 2020 with coronavirus case counts for August 28.

Editors note: updated on September 4, 2020 with coronavirus case counts for September 4.

Editors note: updated on September 11, 2020 with coronavirus case counts for September 10.

Editors note: updated on September 19, 2020 with coronavirus case counts for September 18.

Editors note: updated on September 25, 2020 with coronavirus case counts for September 24.

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