Colombian street food seems to be available everywhere in Medellín and other cities in Colombia. And there are so many options. Colombian street food can be found at busy intersections, in the parks, near metro stations and in many other places in the city. In this article, I look at nine Colombian street food options you should definitely try.

Traveling is increasingly less about going somewhere to see historical sites and natural wonders, but venturing to a destination to taste the food. Certainly, for me indulging in the local cuisine is a major component of the ‘to-do’ list on my travels.  In fact, I often find out what the local dishes are and where I should try them before I decide which major landmark to photograph.

I believe that to truly understand a country’s culture, history and people, you must first appreciate and understand its culinary specialties. And the best place to discover such delights is on the street.

Colombians are particularly fond of food that has a combination sweet and salty flavors. From fried food, to milky juices and all bewildering array of corn manifestations, nearly all of their dishes have hints of savory and sweet.

Colombian food is also very regional, and there is a different approach to national dishes in each city you visit.  In fact, some of these dishes are only found here in Medellín. So, head to the streets to try these particularly Antioquian delights.  Note the above photo is of churros, with a sweet donut taste.

Arepas de chócolo are one of the most common street foods you will encounter in Colombia

Arepas de chócolo are one of the most common street foods you will encounter in Colombia

Colombian Street Food #1. Arepas de Chócolo

For a country that uses corn prolifically in their cooking, it is no wonder that arepas have become a street food staple in Colombia. Arepas come in numerous varieties. In restaurants, you’ll typically be served a bland white corn half-dollar version.

In stark difference, at street food stalls in the Andean region you’ll find the arepa de chócolo. These thick, sweet, yellow corn cakes are lathered in butter, then fried on a griddle until golden brown. Then more butter is slapped on before a quarter inch slice of Colombian fresh white cheese is placed on top.

In this street food mix, the corn patty provides the sweetness, whilst the creamy, soft cheese provides the contrasting salt.

Arepas de queso in Medellín are topped with a swirl of sweetened condensed milk to provide an indulgent snack

Arepas de queso in Medellín are topped with a swirl of sweetened condensed milk to provide an indulgent snack

Colombian Street Food #2. Arepas de Queso

In addition to the arepa de chócolo, you can indulge in a very unique arepa in Medellin called the arepa de queso.

Usually sold at the same stalls, this arepa version is a mixture of corn flour with copious amounts of cheese. This is stirred together as a batter then fried on a griddle. The mushy concoction is flattened to a patty then doused with sweetened condensed milk.  A heart attack inducing treat for sure, but oh so worth the risk.

Būnelos are a savory take on the American donut ball and are the perfect accompaniment with a coffee for breakfast. This store near Parque El Poblano has been frying them up for over 20 years

Būnelos are a savory take on the American donut ball and are the perfect accompaniment with a coffee for breakfast. This store near Parque El Poblano has been frying them up for over 20 years

Colombian Street Food #3. Buñuelos

Buñuelos are both a traditional Christmas dish and a popular breakfast treat for Colombians.

Slightly larger than golfball size, these tasty morsels are concocted of salty flour and small curd white cheese. They are rolled into a ball then fried until golden brown.

Best served piping hot. Near Parque El Pobaldo on the corner of Calle 9 and Carrera 43B you can find a shop that has been frying up this quintessential street food for Colombians and tourists alike for over 20 years. 

Making Buñuelos at El Peregrino restaurant next to Parque Sabaneta

Making Buñuelos at El Peregrino restaurant next to Parque Sabaneta

In Sabaneta, next to Parque Sabaneta to the right of the church is the El Peregrino restaurant that is famous for its Buñuelos. This place makes normal size Buñuelos as well some giant Buñuelos that are more watermelon size.

Plastic cups full of sliced tropical fruit can be purchased all over Medellin from street food carts. Maria at San Antonio stations arguably sells the best ripe mango in town

Plastic cups full of sliced tropical fruit can be purchased all over Medellin from street food carts. Maria at San Antonio stations arguably sells the best ripe mango in town

Colombian Street Food #4. Tropical Fruit

Colombia offers a cornucopia of exotic tropical fruits – many you may have never heard of. And all over Medellin you will find ladies with carts dishing up sliced fresh fruit in plastic ups.

One of the most popular options is mango. Colombians like to indulge in a cup of sliced green mango doused in lime juice and salt and served with a toothpick as an afternoon snack.

One of the best places to try this sensation is at San Antonio metro station. Just at the entrance to the tramway you will find the super friendly Maria most weekends with her cart of fresh tropical fruit, ready to delight your taste buds.

Tropical fruit juices, made with either milk or water, are abundant in Colombia and come in a dizzying array of varieties, from the limonada de coco pictured here to passion fruit

Tropical fruit juices, made with either milk or water, are abundant in Colombia and come in a dizzying array of varieties, from the limonada de coco pictured here to passion fruit

Colombian Street Food #5. Jugos (Juices)

Due to the region’s abundance of fresh tropical fruit on hand, it is no surprise juices are a cornerstone of the Colombian diet. From the local mercado (market) to specialized stands like Cosechas (www.cosechasexpress.com), to every restaurant menu, you don’t have to go far to find a jugos (fruit juice).

My favorite has become the limonada de coco – a blend of ice, coconut milk and lime.  A refreshing afternoon pick-me-up. Jugos are typically made to your liking with your choice of aqua (water) or leche (milk) and sin (without) or con (with) azúcar (sugar).

More unusual fruit varieties to try in your jugos include the borojó, which is a fruit from the West Country that locals claim has aphrodisiac qualities, but to me tastes like cheese that’s gone off. Also popular are soursop, guanábana, lulo and maracuyá (passion fruit).

Obleas are a Colombian dessert that stuffs cheese, jam, and caramel sauce between layers of thin wafers

Obleas are a Colombian dessert that stuffs cheese, jam, and caramel sauce between layers of thin wafers

Colombian Street Food #6. Obleas

One of the more intriguing street foods I’ve tried in Colombia is the oblea – a traditional sweet treat that you can find in every major city.

Obleas consist of plate sized thin wafers that are sandwiched with your choice of a bewildering mix of fillings. The todo (all) version is first spread with a thin layer of raspberry jam. Then another wafer is stacked on top before adding a thick layer of shredded white cheese. On goes yet another wafer, where in the third layer arequipe (a caramel sauce made with sweetened condensed milk) is added.

This sandwich process continues until you have an inch wedge stack that gets wrapped in foil before being presented to you. This combination of sweet and salty was a step too far me, but worth a try once.

Empanadas are perhaps the most well-known Colombian street food and are readily available in different varieties

Empanadas are perhaps the most well-known Colombian street food and are readily available in different varieties

Colombian Street Food #7. Empanadas

Empanadas are the ubiquitous Colombian street food. They are widely available everywhere, particularly street vendors.

These bite-sized snacks are typically stuffed with minced beef and cubed potatoes and encased in a cornmeal doughy bread that is deep fat fried. Vegetarian and chicken versions are also available. To spice up your empanada, try topping it with a teaspoon of fresh picante sauce.

Colombian churros differ in appearance to their Spanish cousin, but still have that sweet, donut taste

Colombian churros differ in appearance to their Spanish cousin, but still have that sweet, donut taste

Colombian Street Food #8. Churros

Colombian churros are slightly different than the Spanish variety. Here they are small and circular and generally are served sprinkled with sugar instead of a side dish of chocolate. But they still have that sweet donut taste.

The churros pictured here are from a street vendor in Comuna 13, who indulged my sweet tooth by smothering my brown paper bag of full of churros with arequipe. Yum!

In Cartagena, Colombian patacones are served with fresh ceviche

In Cartagena, Colombian patacones are served with fresh ceviche

Colombian Street Food #9. Patacones

Last but by no means least, you must try patacones. Patacones are made from mashed green plantains that are shaped into a flat patty then twice-fried.

Served frequently in restaurants as a side dish, they are also commonly sold by street vendors.  This snack can be spiced up with hagao (tomato and onion sauce) or topped with an array of meats and avocado.

Medellín Street Food Tours

Several companies in Medellin offer street food excursions.  I went with Toucan’s Medellin Street Food Tour which can be booked through Toucan Cafe in El Pobaldo on Calle 10 or online. We reviewed this Toucan street food tour here as one of the best walking tours in the city.

This tour not only takes you to the best places to try all of these foods, but also integrates a historical overview of the city and a first-hand account of how Medellin is transforming through urban regeneration projects and street art.

Here are three Medellín Street Food tour options:

  1. Toucan Cafe Medellín Street Food Tour – about 4 hours and costs 100,000 to 300,000 pesos depending how many are on the tour.
  2. La Mesa Medellín Street Food Tour – about 3 hours for $55 per adult and $18 per child aged 7-13, under 7 free.
  3. Tasty Town Medellín Street Food Tour – about 3 hours for $42.99 per adult and $13.99 per child aged 7-13.

Bogotá and Cartagena Street Food Tours

Street food tours are also available in Bogotá and Cartagena. And here are four tours in Bogotá and Cartagena:

  1. La Mesa Bogotá Street Food Tour – about 3 hours for $55 per adult and $19 per child aged 7-13, under 7 free.
  2. Free Tour Bogotá Street Food Tour – about 3 hours and free but tips are recommended.
  3. Cartagena Connections Cartagena Street Food Tour – about 2 to 2.5 hours for $30.
  4. La Mesa Cartagena Street Food Tour – about 3 hours for $55 per adult and $19 per child aged 7-13, under 7 free.

The Bottom Line: Take a Street Food Tour

Are your taste buds watering yet?  If your stomach is aching to try all of these delicacies, then I highly recommend a street food tour.

Alternatively, explore the streets on your own and let your adventurous taste buds lead the way. But whatever you do, make sure your tourist itinerary of Medellin includes some stops to eat delicious street food.

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Editors note: updated on October 4, 2018 to add street food tour options in Medellín, Bogotá and Cartagena based on a reader suggestion.