Medellín vs Mexico City, Mexico, which is really the better place to live? In our Medellín vs Mexico City comparison, we comprehensively compare the two cities in 19 categories to see which is the better place to live in for expats.

We previously published an article about 11 reasons why Medellín is considered a top foreign retirement location. The foreign retirement publications have for several years been touting Colombia as a top foreign retirement location.

And the International Living retirement publication ranked the country of Colombia as its sixth best foreign retirement location in 2018 and Mexico is its third best foreign retirement location.

Several Medellin Guru readers asked for a comparison of Medellín with Mexico City, as we have published several comparisons in the past.

Mexico City is located in the Valley of Mexico, which is a large valley in the high plateaus in central Mexico. And Mexico City is the largest city in Mexico with a metro population of about 21 million.

Medellín is the second largest city in Colombia with a metro population of about 4 million located in a valley in the Colombian Andes Mountains in Colombia. And mountains surround Medellín with a river running though the city.

Many expats I have met living in Medellín prefer Medellín. And expats living in the Mexico City tend to prefer Mexico City. However, many of these expats living in one of these two places have never traveled to the other. It’s not really fair to compare two places if you have not been to both of them.

I have lived in Medellín for over eight years. But I have traveled several times for business and vacation to Mexico City. In my opinion, both places have their pluses and minuses. No place in the world is perfect.

Note, the following 19 categories in this Medellín vs Mexico City comparison are in no particular order. And where possible in our Medellín vs Mexico City comparison, we provide some statistics to back up how we chose the winner of each category in our comparison.

Medellin, Colombia, photo by Jenny Bojinova

Medellin, Colombia, photo by Jenny Bojinova

Mexico City, photo by Ricardo Gómez Garrido

Mexico City, photo by Ricardo Gómez Garrido

1. Climate – Medellín vs Mexico City

Medellín arguably wins here. The temperature during the year in Medellín averages 72.5 °F (22.5 °C). The Medellín weather and climate is a benefit of living in the city.

Also, Medellín is also known as “La Ciudad de la Eterna Primavera”, or the city of eternal spring. The average temperature in Medellín typically only varies by about 1 °F during the year.

In Medellín, the high daily average temperature ranges from 81.0 to 82.8 ° F (27.0 to 28.2 °C). And the low daily average ranges from 61.7 to 63.3 ° F (16.5 to 17.4 °C).

In comparison in Mexico City, the temperature during the entire year averages a cooler 63.5 ° F (17.5 °C).

During the year, the average high temperature in Mexico City ranges from 71.1 to 80.2 ° F (21.7 to 26.8 °C). And the average low temperature typically ranges from 45.3 to 56.3 ° F (7.4 to 13.2 °C).

During the year on some days in Mexico City it can get to below 32.0 ° F (0.0 °C) for the low temperature. So, with the cooler temperatures in Mexico City, heating is needed by most expats living in the city.

In terms of rainfall, in Medellín there is one month out of the year with heavy rain (October), which is normally over 220 mm (nearly 9 inches) of rain. The average rainfall in Medellín for the entire year is about 69 inches (1,752 mm) per year.

In comparison, it rains less in Mexico. But there is a rainy season with the two rainiest months being July and August in Mexico City. In July and August there is typically over 179 mm (over 7 inches) of rain. And the average rainfall in Mexico City for the entire year is about 33.3 inches (846.1 mm) per year.

In terms of humidity, Medellín has higher humidity on average. The humidity in Medellín averages 67 percent during the year. And in Mexico City the humidity averages 56 percent during the year.

Medellín arguably wins this category due to the cooler climate in Mexico City which requires heating, which isn’t needed in Medellín.

2. Cost of Living – Medellín vs Mexico City

Medellín wins here. Apartment properties I have seen in Mexico City tend to rent for or sell for at least 30-50 percent higher prices than similar properties in Medellín. And sometimes even higher.

In addition, I have seen some properties for sale in the Mexico City with over 70 percent higher prices compared to similar properties in Medellín.

Also, the cost of living site Numbeo reports that the cost of living is more expensive in Mexico City in almost every category compared to the prices in Medellín. Also, the Expatistan cost of living website reports that the cost of living in Mexico City is 21 percent higher than in Medellín.

However, some expats living in Mexico try to avoid the higher cost of living in Mexico City by living in a small town.

Hospital Pablo Tobón Uribe, the best hospital in Medellín, photo by SajoR

Hospital Pablo Tobón Uribe, the best hospital in Medellín, photo by SajoR

3. Healthcare – Medellín vs Mexico City

Medellín wins here.  Good healthcare is a very important category for retirees.

Medellín has nine of the top 58 ranked hospitals in Latin America. And Colombia has 23 of the best hospitals in Latin America.

In comparison, Mexico City only has one of the top ranked hospitals in Latin America. And the entire country of Mexico only has four of the top ranked hospitals in Latin America that are located in Mexico City, Queretaro, Cancun and San Pedro Garza Garcia.

Médica Sur in Mexico City, the only top ranked hospital in Latin America in Mexico City, photo courtesy of Médica Sur

Médica Sur in Mexico City, the only top ranked hospital in Latin America in Mexico City, photo courtesy of Médica Sur

Here is a list of all the top ranked hospitals in Medellín and Mexico City, with the rankings in the top 58 hospitals in Latin America:

  1. Hospital Pablo Tobón Uribe, Medellín (#9)
  2. Médica Sur, Mexico City (#12)
  3. Hospital Universitario de San Vicente Fundación, Medellín (#16)
  4. Clínica las Américas, Medellín (#23)
  5. Hospital General de Medellín, Medellín (#28)
  6. Clínica Universitaria Bolivariana, Medellín (#34)
  7. Clínica El Rosario, Medellín (#43)
  8. Clínica Cardio Vid, Medellín (#44)
  9. Clínica Medellín, Medellín (#53)
  10. Clínica Las Vegas, Medellín (#58)

In addition, WHO ranks Colombia’s healthcare system as #22 out of 191 countries it ranked, which is ranked higher than many wealthier countries like the United States (#37), Germany (#25), Canada (#30) and Australia (#32).

Mexico’s healthcare system is ranked lower than Colombia’s healthcare system by WHO, as they rank Mexico at #61 out of 191 countries compared to #22 for Colombia.

The bottom line is that Medellín has nine of the top hospitals in Latin America compared to Mexico City with only one of the top hospitals in Latin America. And WHO ranks Colombia’s healthcare system higher than the healthcare system in Mexico. So, Medellín wins this category.

4. Traffic – Medellín vs Mexico City

Medellín wins here. In a survey by Waze in 2016, Mexico City was ranked with worse traffic than Medellín.

Mexico City has a metro population of about 21 million compared to Medellín with a metro population of about 4 million. So, Mexico City has over five times the population of Medellín.  As a result, Mexico City can have worse traffic than in Medellín.

But traffic can get bad in Medellín during rush hours. It can sometimes take an hour or more during rush hour to get to some places in Medellín. The worst traffic in the Medellín metro in my experience tends to be in El Poblado, El Centro and Envigado.

However, there is worse traffic in Latin America than in found in Medellín. In my experience, the traffic is much worse in the bigger cities of Mexico City, Bogotá and São Paulo.

The Medellín Metro in El Centro

The Medellín Metro in El Centro

5. Public Transportation – Medellín vs Mexico City

The two cities tie here.  Both Medellín and Mexico City have comprehensive metro systems and extensive networks of buses.

The Medellín Metro is a comprehensive and inexpensive system. Furthermore, it integrates two rail lines, four Metrocable cable-car lines, two Metroplús elongated bus lines, a Tranvía tramcar line and even feeder Metro buses. Medellín’s metro system has over 60 stations throughout the city.

The Mexico City Metro, photo by Gobierno CDMX

The Mexico City Metro, photo by Gobierno CDMX

Mexico City also has a comprehensive metro system – Sistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC), which is the ninth largest metro system in the world with 12 lines and over 190 stations. Mexico City’s metro is larger as it is serving the much larger city of Mexico City.

Both Medellín and Mexico City also have extensive networks of public buses. And the buses in both Mexico City and Medellín are inexpensive.

It is possible to live in Medellín or Mexico City without a car with the inexpensive public transportation in both cities. Reportedly about 80 percent of the expats living in Medellín don’t have a car. Since both cities have extensive metro systems and extensive networks of buses, the two cities tie in this category.

6. Safety – Medellín vs Mexico City

Mexico City arguably wins here. Mexico City generally has lower crime rates than are found in the city of Medellín.

However, there is a “drug war” that has been taking place in Mexico for several years now. But this primarily impacts a narrow area right along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Mexico’s homicide rate was 33.3 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2018, which was an increase of 15 percent compared to 2017 and the highest count in history in Mexico. However, Mexico City’s homicide rate was lower than the overall country of Mexico at 14.4 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2018. But this was the highest on record for Mexico City.

In comparison, the homicide rate in Medellín of 24.75 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2018 was up from a homicide rate of 20 in 2015 in Medellín.

But over the past few years Medellín has experienced a homicide rate that is lower than is found in St. Louis, Baltimore, Detroit or New Orleans in the U.S. Furthermore, Medellín dropped off of the list of the 50 most dangerous cities in the world a few years ago based on homicide rates.

We previously looked at security in Medellín and expat safety tips. In addition, our Medellín safety tips also apply in Mexico City.

Also, in a survey of 12,548 Colombians, Medellín ranked higher than all other cities in Colombia in terms of citizens feeling safe in their barrio (neighborhood) – slide 41.

7. Pollution – Medellín vs Mexico City

The two cities arguably tie here Both Medellín and Mexico City have pollution problems. According to the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) 2018 Ambient Air Quality Database, Medellín is ranked #9 out of the most polluted cities and towns in Latin America based on PM2.5 pollutants.

Medellín’s biggest issue is that it’s located in a canyon. Mountains surround the city of Medellín. So, the pollution in Medellín tends to stay in the metropolitan area. This is similar to the problem in Denver in the U.S. But fairly regular rain in the city can help clean the atmosphere.

Mexico City also has pollution problems. In 1992, the United Nations named Mexico City “the most polluted city on the planet.”. Air pollution has been a major issue in the huge city of Mexico City for decades.

Mexico City is situated in a valley surrounded by mountains on three sides. And the worst time of the year for air pollution in Mexico City is typically near the end of the winter months (particularly February and March).

However, air pollution concentrations are always high in Mexico City from 6 am to 9 am, during peak traffic hours. In addition, High concentrations of air pollution in Mexico City also occurs on days when the there is little wind to disperse pollutants.

Since both Medellín and Mexico City have pollution problems, the two cities arguably tie in this category.

T2 at the Mexico City International Airport, photo by Dirk Ingo Franke

T2 at the Mexico City International Airport, photo by Dirk Ingo Franke

8. Travel Access to North America, Europe and Latin America – Medellín vs Mexico City

Mexico City wins hereThe Mexico City International Airport has non-stop flights year-round to over 45 international locations.

From Mexico City you can fly non-stop to Atlanta, Austin, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas/Fort Worth, Detroit, Houston, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, Newark, New York-JFK, Orlando, Phoenix, Salt Lake City, San Antonio, San Francisco, Toronto, Vancouver and Washington D.C in the U.S. and Canada.

Also, the Mexico City Airport has a several non-stop flights to Europe and many other locations in Latin America plus many locations in Mexico.

Inside José María Córdova international airport

Inside José María Córdova international airport

Medellín’s José María Córdova international airport (MDE) is the second largest airport in Colombia. This airport has non-stop flights to 12 international locations in the U.S., Europe and Latin America.

From the MDE airport there are non-stop flights available to Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Miami and New York (JFK) in the U.S. In addition, from MDE you can fly non-stop to Madrid in Europe. Also, you can fly non-stop to Cancún, Lima, Maracaibo, Mexico City, Panama City, San Salvador and Valencia.

In addition, there are more domestic Colombia flights available from Medellín as the city has two airports: the international José María Córdova airport and the domestic Olaya Herrera airport (EOH). From Medellín’s two airports you can fly non-stop to over 30 cities in Colombia.

The bottom line you can fly non-stop to over 45 international locations from the airport in Mexico City. So, Mexico City wins this category.

Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City at night, photo by Daniel Case

Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City at night, photo by Daniel Case

9. Things to Do – Medellín vs Mexico City

Mexico City wins here. Mexico City and the nearby region have more things to do than in Medellín and nearby.

TripAdvisor has over 630 things to do listed for Mexico City. And it has less than 230 things to do listed for Medellín. While this is unscientific it demonstrates there are more things to do in Mexico City compared to Medellín.

If we include Medellín plus the other municipalities in the Aburrá Valley and nearby pueblos, TripAdvisor has over 400 things listed to do. But this is still less than the number of things to do listed for Mexico City.

The bottom line is that there are over 630 things to do in the Mexico City metro area So, Mexico City wins this category.

10. Restaurants and Nightlife – Medellín vs Mexico City

Mexico City wins here. Mexico City is a huge city with over five times the metro population of Medellín.

If you look on TripAdvisor, it lists over 5,600 restaurants in Mexico City and over 1,500 restaurants in Medellín. You will have a much bigger choice of restaurants in Mexico City. Also, I happen to like Mexican cuisine more than Colombian cuisine.

In terms of nightlife, Mexico City also has many more nightlife option than Medellín due to having a metro population of about 21 million.

Since Mexico City is a much bigger city, it has more restaurant and nightlife options. So, Mexico City easily wins this category.

11. Seismic Risk – Medellín vs Mexico City

Medellín wins here. Mexico has a history of seismic activity. Mexico City has been impacted by at least three seismic events that caused deaths since 1950.

Mexico City is located on a plateau surrounded by mountains and volcanoes. This plateau region was covered by lakes in ancient times. As the aquifer under the city drained, it has been discovered that Mexico City sits atop a combination of dirt and sand that is much less stable than bedrock and can be quite volatile during an earthquake.

A 7.1-magnitude earthquake in 2017 was centered in the town of Puebla about 110 miles from Mexico City. This resulted in 370 people being killed by the earthquake and related building collapses including 228 in Mexico City and more than 6,000 were injured.

A 8.1-magnitude earthquake in 1985 was centered 350 miles from Mexico City but the powerful quake left about 10,000 dead in Mexico City and 30,000 injured and thousands more homeless. The earthquake resulted in 3,000 buildings in Mexico City being demolished and another 100,000 suffered serious damage.

Medellín historically hasn’t experienced as much seismic activity as Mexico City. According to geologists, Medellín is situated on a giant block of andesite, which is a gigantic and deep-rooted hunk of igneous rock. This rock is hard like granite and resistant to seismic motion.

While there is no certainty, this resistance to seismic motion likely makes Medellín safer than many other places in Colombia and safer than Mexico City.

12. Taxes – Colombia vs Mexico

The two places arguably tie here. We highly recommend talked to a tax professional to understand the tax implications before moving to another county.

Tax residents in both Colombia and Mexico are taxed on worldwide income. In Colombia, you become a tax resident after spending 183 days in a year in the country.

And in Mexico you become a tax resident after establishing an abode regardless of time in the country. Basically, if SAT (the IRS of Mexico) believes Mexico is your “center of vital interests” they will classify you as a resident for tax purposes.

In addition, Colombia no longer taxes foreign pensions.

Mexico tax residents are liable to a progressive tax on their worldwide income ranging between 1.92 – 35 percent. And Colombia tax residents are liable to a progressive tax on their worldwide income ranging between 0 – 33 percent.

We looked at filing income taxes in Colombia in 2017. Colombia has many income deductions including deductions for expenses related to receiving your income, mortgage interest, health insurance, retirement savings and economic support of dependents.

In addition, in Colombia, you can exclude 25 percent of your salary (up to a limit) from income taxes. Also, some income taxes paid in another country are subtracted from income taxes due in Colombia.

Property taxes in Mexico reportedly average about 1.0 percent of the assessed value of a property.  And property taxes in Colombia typically range from 0.3 to 3.3 percent.

The standard VAT (IVA tax) tax is higher in Colombia at 19 percent for many items. In comparison, the IVA tax for most items in Mexico is currently lower at 16 percent.

13. Job Opportunities – Medellín vs Mexico City

Mexico City wins here. Mexico City is a much larger city with a metro population that has over five times the metro population of Medellín in Colombia. So, clearly there are many more job opportunities in Mexico City.

Mexico City has many very large employers and many multinational companies have offices in Mexico City that are headquartered in the U.S. Medellín has fewer large employers and multinational companies.

But there aren’t that many work opportunities in either place for foreigners. This is particularly the case in Medellín if you don’t speak Spanish fluently. Fluency in Spanish is typically required for the best jobs in Colombia and Mexico.

In both Medellín and Mexico City you can find English teaching job opportunities if you are a native English speaker. However, the pay for English teaching isn’t the greatest in either place.

Also, to work in either Colombia or Mexico will require a visa.

14. Expat Community and Expat Friendly

Medellín arguably wins here. Mexico City has a larger expat community but the expat community in Medellín appears to be much better organized.

There are over 1 million expats from the U.S. in the entire country of Mexico. Baja California reportedly has the most foreigners in Mexico, followed by Jalisco, Chihuahua and the Mexico City Federal District

But Mexico is a big country and foreigners reportedly represent only about 1 percent of the population. Also, there appears to be no reliable statistic of how many expats from North America and Europe are in Mexico City. But it’s likely over 50,000 in the huge city of Mexico City.

The expat community in Medellín is likely much smaller and unfortunately there also aren’t reliable statistics for Medellín. However, I would estimate there may be less than 5,000 expats from North America and Europe living in Medellín.

The expat community in Medellín may be smaller but it’s much better organized. For example, Medellín has large expat groups on Facebook like Medellin Expats with over 17,000 members and hundreds of posts and comments each day.

Also, Medellín has the GringoPaisa (Americans in Medellin) group with over 11,000 members and the Digital Nomads Medellin Facebook group with over 6,000 members.

Mexico City also has Facebook groups including Foreigners in Mexico City (DF) with over 19,000 members and the Foreigners Expats in Mexico City (CDMX) with over 3,600 members. But both of these groups are not very active with only about 10 posts per day.

Also, there is the Mexico City Digital Nomads group on Facebook but it has only 695 members and averages only about two posts per day.

In addition, in Medellín there are many regularly organized meetups for expats each week. Four expats I met in the past year in Medellín that used to live in Mexico City all told me there aren’t nearly as many regularly organized events in Mexico City for expats as there are in Medellín.

Also, there is nothing in Mexico City like the monthly Medellin Guru meetup that has averaged 165+ attendees in each of the past four months.

Finally, both Mexico and Colombia are rated as expat friendly countries by InterNations. In 2018 when looking at the best and worst places for expats, InterNations ranked Mexico as #4 out of 68 countries. And Colombia is ranked #9.

Mexico City may have a bigger expat community. But the expat community in Medellín looks to be much better organized with expat events every week and much more active Facebook groups. So, Medellín edges out Mexico City in this category.

15. Internet Availability and Infrastructure Reliability

Mexico City wins here. In Mexico City, it is possible to get higher Internet speeds than in Medellín.

In Medellín, it is possible to get up to 300 Mbps Internet speed from Claro. In addition, up to 150 Mbps speed is available from Tigo-UNE and up to 40 Mbps from Movistar.

Most buildings in Medellín will have service from at least one of these three providers. And all three providers in Medellín provide triple-play Internet/TV/phone services. Also, we have a guide to Internet and cable TV providers in Medellín.

In Mexico City, it is possible to get up to 500 Mbps Internet speed from Totalplay, 200 Mbps from Telmex, 200 Mbps from Axtel and up to 50 Mbps is available from Issi. All four providers offer triple-play Internet/TV/phone services.

Furthermore, the highest speed Internet in both cities will normally be available only in the newest apartment buildings. In older buildings, you may be limited to lower speeds.

In terms of other infrastructure like electricity and water, the two places are similar. In both places and electricity and water services are generally reliable.

In Medellín the tap water is safe to drink. While in Mexico City, people have long been avoiding the tap water, as it has a notorious reputation of having low quality. In fact, Mexicans are so accustomed to drinking bottled water that they’re the world’s largest per capita consumer of bottled water.

Since Mexico City has higher Internet speeds available, Mexico City edges out Medellín in this category.

16. Economic Freedom, Ease of Starting a Business and Corruption

Medellín wins here. Since both places are in different countries it is good to compare the countries in terms economic freedom and ease of starting a business as well as corruption when considering them as places to live.

The Heritage Foundation ranks countries in terms of economic freedom. It ranks Colombia as a “moderately free country”. It ranks Colombia #42 out of the 180 countries it ranks in terms of economic freedom in the world.

Heritage Foundation ranks Mexico lower than Colombia with a “moderately free country. It currently ranks Mexico #63 out of 180 countries in terms of economic freedom.

In terms of ease of doing business, Colombia is ranked #65. And Mexico is ranked #54 in terms of ease of doing business. So, it’s generally a bit easier to do business in Mexico.

Corruption is found in both countries. Mexico is ranked #135 out of 180 countries in terms of corruption perception by Transparency International. And Colombia is ranked #96. So, corruption is perceived to be worse in Mexico.

Since Colombia ranks better than Mexico in terms of both economic freedom and corruption perception, Medellín wins this category.

The huge Santa Fe mall in Mexico City, photo by Serge Saint

The huge Santa Fe mall in Mexico City, photo by Serge Saint

17. Shopping – Medellín vs Mexico City

Mexico City wins here.  Mexico City is a much larger city than Medellín. So, it obviously has more shopping options.

The largest mall in Mexico City is Centro Comerical Santa Fe, which has about 4.3 million square feet (400,000 square meters) of space, which makes it the largest enclosed shopping complex in Latin America. Also, Mexico City has many more malls and I counted over 35 in the huge city.

Medellín is a smaller city so it has fewer malls than Mexico City. And we have looked at 22 malls in Medellín including the 13 best malls in Medellín.

The Viva Envigado Mall in Envigado

The Viva Envigado Mall in Envigado

For example, Santafé mall is one of the largest malls in Medellín with over 400 shops. And in October 2018, Viva Envigado, the largest mall in Colombia opened in Envigado, directly south of Medellín, which also has about 400 shops.

The bottom line is that Mexico City has more malls and many more shopping options. This is due to Mexico City having a metro population that is about five times larger than in Medellín. But Medellín also has many shopping options.

18. English Proficiency Levels – Medellín vs Mexico City

Mexico City arguably wins here. Mexico City in my experience tends to have more locals that speak English than locals that speak English in Medellín.

Mexico City is the largest city in Mexico with many foreigners working for international companies in Mexico. Also, many Americans from the U.S. visit Mexico City. So, English is more frequently used.

In Medellín you will some English speakers in hotels and nicer restaurants. And some of the taxi drivers and shopkeepers in Medellín speak some English. Also, executives at larger companies are typically are bilingual.

But in everyday life in Medellín you will be somewhat more challenged to find English speakers than in Mexico City.

Education First ranks Mexico as #57 in its English Proficiency Index with a score of 49.76, which means a low level of English proficiency. And Colombia is ranked #60 with a score of 48.90, which is also a low level of proficiency (a higher number signifies that more people speak English).

But like Medellín not everyone in Mexico City speaks English. If you want to be able to speak to all the locals in Mexico City you will need some Spanish. Spanish is needed more in Medellín.

19. Ease of Getting a Visa

Medellín arguably wins this category. Colombia and Mexico both have a number of visa options. And the visa processes for both countries are fairly straightforward.

However, Mexico’s visas generally have higher income and investment requirements.

For example, a retirement visa in Mexico is a Residente Temporal (RT), which is a temporary resident similar to a Migrant visa in Colombia. Previously the pension requirement for a RT visa was nearly $1,600 per month but this is increasing in 2019 due to a new minimum wage in Mexico.

In comparison the Colombia retirement visa in 2019 only requires a monthly pension income of 2,484,348 Colombian pesos (COP) per month ($792 USD at the exchange rate of 3,136 COP to USD).

The Mexico investment visas also have higher investment requirements than the Colombia investment visas.

Colombia streamlined its visa process a couple years ago and you can apply online, fewer documents are required and approvals are now relatively fast, typically in about a week.

Medellín arguably wins this category due to Colombia having lower income requirements and lower investment requirement needed for visas than in Mexico.

The Medellin Guru City and Place Comparisons

We have compared on the Medellin Guru website:

Mexico City, photo by Edmund Garman

Mexico City, photo by Edmund Garman

The Bottom Line: Medellín vs Mexico City 

In our Medellín vs Mexico City comparison:

  • Medellín wins in 8 of our 19 categories.
  • Mexico City wins in 8 of our 19 categories.
  • The two cities tie in 3 categories.

So, in this unscientific and somewhat subjective Medellín vs Mexico City comparison of 19 categories, Mexico City and Medellín tie if you equally weigh the categories. But it really comes down to which categories are more important for you.

For example, if having a lower cost of living, better climate and better healthcare are your most important categories, then Medellín would win for you.

And if having more restaurants and shopping options, better travel access and more English spoken are your most important categories, then Mexico City would win for you.

Both of these cities in our Medellín vs Mexico City comparison have their pluses and minuses. I prefer living in Medellín due to it having an eternal spring climate year-round, low cost of living and very good healthcare.

The bottom line in our Medellín vs Mexico City comparison is that the best place to live is the best place to live for you. Everyone has different priorities. The only way to know which place is the best for you is to spend time there.

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